The Easter Bunny is Making Me Chubby

I’m also going to blame Santa, St. Patrick, Revolutionary War veterans, ok all veterans, the Pagans that started Halloween and the Pilgrims.

I realize a furry bunny did not force a chocolate one down my throat; or peeps or jelly beans.  So maybe I should blame my metabolism for failing me when it should clearly know that I like to celebrate every holiday with food; it’s the American way.  Continue reading

Women like Audrey and Diana

Did you ever think about how the most iconic and fascinating women are usually the most insecure?  Of course this is something we learn post-mortem usually.  But looking back, the signs are usually so blatantly obvious.

As I looked through some biographies on my bookshelf, I thought about two iconic females represented there; Audrey Hepburn and Princess Diana.  Two women that I had admiration for; Audrey I discovered in my late teens after she’d already been gone for years and Princess Diana who fascinated me from childhood and most of the world from the very start.  Two generous and stylish women, who more often than not, played by their own rules.

Audrey

“If you want to get psychological, you can say my definiteness stems from underlying feelings of insecurity and inferiority.  I couldn’t conquer these feelings by acting indecisive.  I found the only way to get the better of them was by putting my foot down, by adopting a forceful and concentrated drive.”  – Audrey Hepburn

They individually gave so much to the world, through charity and hands-on efforts in previously disregarded regions that needed a spotlight from a respected figure.  Both battled eating disorders, depression and unfulfilling relationships; often waging a war with an inferiority complex and constant outside pressure.  Both finding solice in children and humanitarianism.  I wonder if it takes such a sensitive and genuine character to produce such admirable gifts, to be so altruistic.  Could an egotistical and self-assured woman be so generous?

They say so much of who we are stems from our childhood.  Both of these women came from broken homes and found in their youth, comfort in solitude.   They eventually went from unknown young ladies to instant celebrities, with constant criticism and a yearning for normalcy.  I think it takes a special kind of woman to face the world in such a public way and despite personal battles, finding happiness in the people they can trust and in the causes they can fight for.

A young Diana Spencer

“I think the biggest disease the world suffers from in this day and age is the disease of people feeling unloved. I know that I can give love for a minute, for half an hour, for a day, for a month, but I can give. I am very happy to do that, I want to do that.”    Princess Diana

 

Reference:  “How to be Lovely” by Melissa Hellstern