Telegrams -stop- The lost communication?

Electric telegraphy is form of communication which began consistent and worldwide innovation in the 1830’s.  If you have ever watched an old movie, it was the classic way to send word of a scene changing moment.  Telegrams brought tragic news of a loved one to a family or portrayed a swoony leading man providing the details for a dinner date to his leading woman.

The word “telegraphic” actually means “short” or “terse”.  It was initially an unemotional way to send the facts, in a quick and direct nature that initially utilized morse code for practical purposes.  Innovators and scientists throughout the world can be credited for creating this early form of communication.   So many developments in such a short period of time were born of this invention, starting from beekers with coils and chemicals to ultimately creating the earliest form of fax machines.  Though we use telegraphy today, through higher technological avenues such as e-mail or text messaging, the first telegraphy outlet was quite slower and delayed any sort of immediate response.

Though the traditional paper telegram business has gone by the wayside, there are now websites that allow you to join in on the old-fashioned fun.  Just as there is something special about receiving an unelectronic birthday card in the mail, it can be exciting to experience something like a telegram, which was such a common and relevant piece of communication for well over a hundred years.

Check out http://telegramstop.com/which allows you to recreate the traditional telegram.  Having used them myself, I was quite impressed with their effort to make it look quite authentic. For those of you who are just simply too high tech, they also have an iPhone app.  Though they did raise their price in the last few weeks, for $6.45 it’ll make you want to pack your steam trunk and hop a train into the past.

Sample courtesy of Telegramstop.com

 

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